What is Growing Out of Your Ear? by Angela Graham Book Blitz!



 
Title: What is Growing Out of Your Ear
Author: Angela Graham
Publisher: AuthorHouse
Pages: 24
Genre: Children's Fiction
Format: Ebook
Purchase at AMAZON

 It is summer and Angela eats a bowl of cherries. After she swallows some cherry pits, her Grandpa warns what will happen -- “A cherry tree will grow out of your ear.” Angela thinks that is silly. Do you believe a cherry tree can grow out of Angela’s ear? 
amazon  
 Angela Graham lives in Ottawa, Canada with her husband, two lively children and their dog. She has enjoyed writing stories for her children since they were young to inspire the love of reading. Angela’s stories add a humourous twist to real life. This story is motivated from Angela’s own childhood.
 

Angela is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

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Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins September 1 and ends on September 13.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, September 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.
Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

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Half the Man I Used to Be by Brian Ray Gross Book Blitz - Win a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

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  Half the Man I Used to Be
Title: Half the Man I Used to Be
Author: Brian Gross
Publisher: iUniverse
Pages: 167
Genre: Self-Help/Motivational
Format: Ebook
 Purchase at AMAZON

All humans have weaknesses. Even mythical warriors and superheroes have a weakness. For author Brian Ray Gross, that weakness is food. This creates an interesting paradox: food is intended to strengthen, nourish, and sustain—but when we consume too much, we become weakened by it. In this weakness, we cannot be the people God intends for us to be. In Half the Man I Used to Be, Gross shares his story about food, weight, and his weight loss journey. He tells how it all came to head in October of 2012, when he found out that he was diabetic and that his liver was failing. He was at his weakest point, and he had a choice to make: he could continue to let the weakness dictate the rest of his life, or he could seek the strength to overcome. He chose the latter, and the kind of strength he needed could only come from God. This memoir discusses Gross’s lifestyle changes and his weight loss success. His story serves to communicate there is hope for all who face the same challenges. It’s not too late to regain the life you desire. You have a creator who made you in his image, and he wants the best for you. You can do this, and when you do, you’ll be glad you did.

  amazon
 Brian Ray Gross earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Morehead State University. He is a social studies and English teacher for the Raceland-Worthington Independent School District. Gross lives in Russell, Kentucky, with his wife, Kristy, and their three children. Brian is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card! 645
Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins September 1 and ends on September 13.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, September 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.
Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

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To Thee We Do Cry by Patricia Monohan


Title: To Thee We Do Cry
Author: Patricia Monohan
Publisher: iUniverse
Pages: 112
Genre: Spiritual
Format: Ebook
Purchase at AMAZON

 In what was the most devastating event of their lives, Tom and Pat Monahan lost their nine-year-old grandson, Tommy, in a house fire in December of 2007. This unimaginable tragedy rocked their lives with pain and sorrow beyond description, of a kind and strength they had never dreamed of. As a way of dealing with this unspeakable grief, Pat Monahan practiced what she preached as a professional bereavement counselor: she began journaling her feelings to work through the pain. Following the depression that comes with grief, she realized that this process was a major key to lifting her depression. In hopes of helping others whose faith has been shattered following the loss of a loved one, Pat presents her recorded thoughts and struggles in To Thee We Do Cry. She describes the impact her grandson Tommy’s life and death had on the entire community of Staten Island; she also emphasizes the importance of coping with the struggle with spirituality while faced with such trauma. In the end, it is faith that will guide someone suffering from a loss back to living a full life once more.

  amazon  

PATRICIA MONAHAN and her husband, Tom, have seven children and eighteen grandchildren. She retired after twenty-seven years as a New York State–Certified alcohol and substance abuse counselor. Following her father’s death, she was trained by the Archdiocese of New York as a bereavement minister.  

Patricia is giving away a $25 Amazon Gift Card!

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Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive one $25 Amazon Gift Certificate or Paypal Cash.
  • This giveaway begins September 1 and ends on September 13.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, September 16.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.
Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Interview with Lady Colin Campbell, author of "Daughter of Narcissus"





ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Lady Colin Campbell is a highly successful and prolific author of several books, including London and New York Times bestsellers, and has been a prominent and often controversial figure in royal and social circles for many years. She perhaps is best known for her international bestselling book Diana in Private, 1992, and her subsequent extended and revelatory biography of the Princess of Wales, The Real Diana published in 2004. She has written books on the Royal Family, been a long term columnist and appeared numerous times on TV and radio as an experienced Royal Insider and expert on the British aristocracy. In 1997 she published her autobiography, A Life Worth Living, which was serialized in The Daily Mail. Born in St. Andrew, Jamaica, she was educated there and in New York, where she lived for seven years. She is connected to British royalty through common ancestors and marriage. She has two sons and lives in London.

You can visit her publisher online at http://www.dynastypress.co.uk/.

Could you please tell us a little about your book?

Daughter of Narcissus is a memoir of my family’s struggle to cope with and move on from my mother Gloria’s narcissistic personality disorder.

NPD is not an easy disorder to deal with, but by being as frank as I could be, I hope I have provided some insight for the reader into what one’s choices and options are, as how one can recover from an NPD parent and go on to be a happy, fulfilled and productive individual.

Did something specific happen to prompt you to write this book?

Something specific did indeed inspire me to write Daughter of Narcissus. I was staying with a great friend in New York and we were discussing our NPD mothers when one of America’s most respected psychoanalysts suggested that I write a book on the subject using my family’s personal experience as the vehicle. She said that she believed I had the ability to do justice to the subject. This in itself was highly complimentary, as she is such an eminent psychoanalyst that a vote of confidence from her, especially on a subject like as complex as NPD, was worth anyone else’s recommendation a hundredfold.

Who or what is the inspiration behind this book?

The eminent American psychoanalyst Dr Erika Freeman was the inspiration for Daughter of Narcissus. When she first suggested that I write about how my family and I survived our mother’s narcissism, I recoiled at the prospect of violating my mother’s privacy. But Erika convinced me that since Gloria was dead, and my family’s experiences might help or inspire others, I almost had a duty to share what I had been through with others. Upon reflection, I thought her point of view had merit, and when it became apparent that my sisters had no objection, I decided to go ahead.

Who is your biggest supporter?

I have never had any one person who would qualify as my biggest supporter. However, I have always had several people who are supporters. In my early days as a writer, Barbara Taylor Bradford was particularly helpful. Later on, the Australian journalist/author Catherine Olsen stepped into Barbara’s shoes. Other friends who are not professionals and might therefore not want their names mentioned have also been supportive over the years.

Your biggest critic?

My biggest critic is fortunately dead. His name was Nigel Dempster, and he was a vicious, poisonous gossip columnist who waged vendettas against a variety of people, including Sir James Goldsmith, the Aga Khan, and Queen Noor of Jordan, for no reason at all except that he was full of hatred and loved hating. When he was retiring – he died of a rare neurological complaint – the Daily Mail in London compiled his Hit List. I was No. 2 on it, immediately below Jimmy Goldsmith. People used to say that I should take being in such hallowed company as a compliment of sorts, but that was scant consolation for the vile and evil things that he used to say.

What cause are you most passionate about and why?

The cause I am most passionate about is civil liberties. I think that we in the West are in danger of seeing our supposedly democratic governments erode many of the freedoms our forefathers spent nearly a millennium acquiring, starting in 1215 when the Magna Carta was signed.

When I was a student in New York in the late 60s we were taught that Thoreau was wise indeed when he said that ‘the least government is the best government’ and that ‘civil disobedience’ could be something admirable. That does not mean that governments should not be responsible and that they should not provide services, but it does mean that they should not be regulating our lives to the extent that the government in Britain does, nor that the US government should violate international treaties such as the Geneva Convention, or use the threat of terrorism to suspend habeas corpus and hold people with charge, trial, or legal representation. We must as a civilization realize that MILLIONS of people died to achieve the freedoms we took for granted for the second half of the 20th century. Do we really want to throw a victory to haters of liberty, whether they come draped in exotic garments or in pin striped suits in Westminster and Washington?

What is the most important thing in your life right now?

My children are by far the most important thing in my life. I cannot envisage ever putting anyone before them, but that does not mean I spoil them. Indeed, one of the lessons I learnt from having a narcissistic mother is how important it is to NOT spoil your child. I believe in praise when it is deserved and scolding when that is appropriate, and while I would hardly say I am a perfect mother or that my boys are angels, they are pretty good guys who can see through the rubbish that is so prevalent in every day life.

What are you currently working on?

I never start one writing one book until I have finished promoting my last one, but I am already contracted to edit and write the foreword for an 18th century memoir dealing with the French Revolution, after which I will be doing a book on the social skills that secure success.

What do you feel has been your greatest achievement as an author?

I think my greatest achievement as a writer to date has been producing the only contemporaneous biography of the Princess of Wales that have stood the test of time well enough for all its contents and conclusions to have been proven to be factual. It took quite a lot of courage to let the world know that Diana was not a saint or an angel, but a complex, contradictory woman with both virtues and vices. When I wrote Diana in Private, I was roundly lambasted – indeed, some of my critics were so hysterical that you would have thought I had said she was Joseph Stalin in drag. As the well-known English anchor, Richard Madeley, had the good grace to admit on his television show, “You were right and we were wrong”.

What do you feel sets this book apart from others in the same genre?

I will rely upon the opinion of Dr. Anna Brocklebank, who feels that Daughter of Narcissus is set apart from other books in its genre by virtue of being a “penetrating and insightful examination of a serious subject in the form of a memoir which actually raises that medium to new heights”.

What is the most important lesson you have learned from life so far?

The most important lesson I have learnt so far is that what ultimately makes one’s life worthwhile isn’t what happens to one, but what one does with what has happened. I believe that the ancient alchemists lost their way when they thought that we can convert base metal into actual gold, but the principle of alchemy nevertheless applies in spiritual terms, and all base metal can be converted into spiritual gold if you have the right attitude. In Daughter of Narcissus I show how my mother had every gift God could have given anyone, yet she ended up a bitter, twisted, miserable human being because she never assumed responsibility for herself and her fate.


ABOUT THE BOOK:

Daughter of Narcissus is a stunning analysis by Lady Colin of her own dysfunctional family positioned at the heart of upper class Jamaican society from the middle of the 20th century to the present day. Covering the end of the British Colonial Age and the rise of a liberated generation, whilst addressing the narcissistic personality of her mother, the author brilliantly interconnects the sociological, political and personal. As she dissects the family dynamics lying beneath the appearance of wealth and power, Lady Colin’s understanding of personality disorder is revelatory: compelling the reader to comprehend the destructive and tragic reality concealed by rational language and behavior.

Set against a backdrop of glamour, wealth and fame, this compulsive book is both a fascinating history of one socially prominent family, and a uniquely detailed analysis of narcissism, its manifestations and how to survive them in order to lead a purposeful and affirming life.

 

Interview with Carol Sue Gershman, author of "The Jewish Lady, The Black Man, and The Road Trip"

Carol Sue Gershman

Constantly reinventing herself, Carol Sue Gershman attened the Miami Dade College Memoir Class and decided that she would turn her two and a half page "Adventure in Love Story" into a book. Never having written before, it was passion that drove her each day to write.

After spending 25 years in New York City, she was one of the first to arrive into the new phenomenon of Miami Beach (South Beach) She is presently writing her next book while working on laws to ban smoking in residential buildings.

Now at 73 she will take her completed book back on the road re-living the cities and states visited on the road trip. You might just see her driving her hot yellow mustang convertible packed with books, hats and what it takes for life on the road.

Interview:
Could you please tell us a little about your book?
My book is primarily a sizzling love story between a passionate, fun loving, interracial , late 60 year old couple. It is a story about life; marriage, children, grandchildren, race, sex, travel, obsession, dormant talents, facelifts and birthday parties, all told in flashbacks. Long over due, I candidly tell what it took to cross the racial boundry at 69, and passionate late life sex.

Did something specific happen to prompt you to write this book?
Yes, my lover walked out on me and I wanted him back. I was obsessed with that thought and it kept me glued to the computer for 9 months morning noon and night. I wanted to shock him with the book, realize our mistakes and go back together again.

Who or what is the inspiration behind this book?
Unquestionably, he was.

Who is your biggest supporter?
At the beginning it was one of my class mates. Then my girlfriends supported me all of the way never tiring of listening to my writings and critiquing them.

Your biggest critic?
my ex- husband....great feedback

What cause are you most passionate about and why?
Banning smoking especially in condo buildings where residents are helpless in their own homes. I had to leave my beautiful home that I owned in Miami (still own it) because of my up stiars neighbor who moved in after me and smokes. I tried everything, pleading with him, fans, diffusers, living behind closed doors and giving up the beautiful Miami fresh air and nothing worked; my chest and lungs hurt and I would wake up hoarse from his night time habit. I had to move. In the end, he is the looser. I left him to destroy his lungs each day.

In the last year have you learned or improved on any skills?
Yes, public speaking. My biggest fear was to get up in front of an audience and speak. I was terrible at it. All I thought about up there was ME and what the audience was thinking of ME. I did not relate or connect at all. I joined Toastmasters on my daughters suggestion, a wonderful organization, and now....... give me an audience and I will speak. I watch the audience closely to see if I am holding their attention. If I see anyone glancing at their watch, I change my tone quicky.

Do you have any rituals you follow when finishing a piece of work? Yes, What's next?

Who has influenced you throughout your career as a writer?
My teacher and class mates at Dade County College; also two friends.

What is the most important thing in your life right now?....
Promoting my book till it reaches the big screen or something profound comes out of it.

What are you currently working on?
Promoting, promoting, promoting and promoting; It is taking me to the unknown; everyday is something new in achieving my goals..

Do you have any advice for writers or readers?
For writers; my advice is to keep writing, get your message out there. Unfortuantely one will never get rich from writing sans a national author. I find myself constantly going through swinging doors and the challenge is to open one.

For Readers, contacting the new author and critiquing good or bad is a wonderful gift.

Is there an author that inspired you to write?
I cannot say so, although during the time I was finishing my book, Eat, Pray and Love was the best seller and I ate, prayed , and loved mine would be too.

What are some of your long term goals?
Well, I would like to become famous. Yes I would. Nothing would make me happier than being on national tv, or giving continued lectures on inspiring women and a few good men to live agelessly and passionately. Then of course selling the movie rights.

What do you feel has been your greatest achievement as an author?When people tell me I have inspired them to change something for the better in their lives.

What do you feel is your biggest strength?
Perfection in achieving my goals. I am unstoppable and find it difficult to take no for an answer. Sometimes I have to restrain my self so to keep the door open for another time, rather than being tenacious as I can easily be. . I am not shy about knocking on doors.

Biggest weakness?
Promoting myself on the internet. That is why I am talking to you.

What do you feel sets this book apart from others in the same genre?
It tells the truth and that sometimes is not easy. I am candid in my writing escpecially about what it took to cross the racial boundry having grown up in the 50's... It tells the truth about passionate rewarding sex between two 60 year olds. Too many young people do not think that older people have sex.... Yes we do, I tell them.

You know the scenario – you’re stuck on an island.† What book would you bring with you and why?
The dictonary. Can you imagine how my vocabulary would be increased when I left the island.

If you could go back and change one day, what would it be?
The day my mom collapsed in my arms. and passed away weeks later.

Are you a different person now than you were 5 years ago?† In what way/s?
Oh my goodness yes. On the race issue alone; I no longer see color. I date both races now and have well crossed over the racial boundry. I worte a book. Who would believe that? As I said in my book, I started out as a daisy and have grown into a giant sunflower and all in five years.

What is the most important lesson you have learned from life so far?
To be compassionate; to tell the truth. I was never a person that lied, but I would be shy or embarressed to say what I meant or reveal much about myself. I have learned to open up and walk my talk and say what I mean; once again I could slow down a bit in that department and keep my mouth shut at times. Who wouldn't?

Is there anything you regret doing/not doing?
I regret not making more investments in South Beach in Miami, which became my home. I was given the opportunity to be a very wealthy woman because I was there first. I was fearful of loosing money that I did not have. Had I borrowed, WOW. I would have had untold wealth. Looking back on it, nobody lost. It was a sure bet. I guess the lesson is to take the opportunity when it is given to you in life. Opportunities are hard to come by. I regret not staying closer to my parents and not being nicer to them. Who knew, that they were so precious.

What is your favorite past-time?
oh well, now? the computer, sending newsletters about my book, getting responses from reader and answering them.

Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
Live your dreams and do not listen to your friends if they try to stop them!

About the Book
A late 60 year old, interracial, innovative, passionate couple travel from Miami to Montreal in a hot yellow mustang convertible visiting family and friends that takes the reader far past the turns of the road.

Cleverly written in flashbooks, this memoir is about life: Marriage, children, grandchildren, race, sex, guilt, loneliness, birthday parties, facelifts, travel, and obsession.

When her lover walked out, it was obsession that drove her to write. Carol Sue Gershman took all of her negative energy and pain and turned it into a book. She hoped that she would shock him with their story; they would read it together, realize their mistakes and go right back together again. She describes her obsession at this age not to be any different from when she was 14 years old.

This book is long overdue; Having grown up in the 50’s she holds back nothing about what it took for her to cross the racial boundary. She details older people having passionate sex telling the younger generations, YES WE DO.

In this page turning and sometimes humorous memoir, she lives agelessly and passionately. Women and a few good men will learn that THEY CAN TOO, if they do not pay any attention to how old they are!

Explore your own passion and purpose as you read this sizzling memoir.

 

Interview with Kathleen Cunningham Guler, author of "A Land Beyond Ravens"

Could you please tell us a little about your book?

A Land Beyond Ravens, as all the other books in the Macsen’s Treasure Series, is a historical spy thriller set in fifth century Britain. It continues the story of master spy Marcus ap Iorwerth’s efforts to keep the country free from oppressive Saxon dominance and to aid in the fulfillment of Myrddin Emrys’ (Merlin) prophecy that a great king called Arthur will one day take the crown. In this, the final installment, Marcus discovers the emerging Christian church is gaining enough power as an independent faction to dangerously shift control of Britain. At the same time, his beloved wife Claerwen, gifted with second sight, is plagued with strange dreams that connect inexplicable doom to both Arthur and a long lost grail sacred to Britain’s high kings. But as Marcus struggles to distract the church, he and Myrddin also set up the very doom Claerwen sees. It seems they accidentally set things in motion that will send a lot of folks off chasing something called a grail…

Who or what is the inspiration behind this book?

The period of fifth century Britain is unfortunately bleak in offering facts for the purpose of writing historical fiction. While I don’t write alternative history, I do ask a lot of “what if?” questions to try to fill in those glaring blanks with logical explanations and motives. The original barebones sketch for A Land Beyond Ravens required the story to include a grail sacred to the high kings, a sense of the growing influence of the Christian church in Britain, and that Arthur would finally become high king. A few other notes floated around involving the main characters of Marcus ap Iorwerth and his wife Claerwen, as well as Myrddin. That, and the framework that history and legend provided as a backdrop, was all I had when I started writing. The main “what if?” turned out to be: what if the seeds of the quest for the Holy Grail were planted long before the adventure began? What if those seeds were planted on purpose? What if it was by accident?

Who is your biggest supporter?

The critique group I’ve belonged to for the last eleven-plus years supports my efforts more than anyone. They are a talented and diverse bunch, fearless in offering advice, constructive criticism and encouragement.

Your biggest critic?

Ditto the previous answer. Good, solid, complete criticism is more constructive than any praise.

What cause are you most passionate about and why?

I love seeing kids enthusiastic about reading (thank you Harry Potter!) and would like to see illiteracy wiped out for good. It’s time to get away from useless, mind-numbing, time-wasting, beer-drinking, so-called entertainment that makes “Screaming Mimi’s” out of people. People do have intelligence—they just need to learn that an activity like reading can provide far better entertainment if they use their minds! Just my two cents.

In the last year have you learned or improved on any skills?

I learned how to create my own book video! It’s posted on my blog: http://kathleenguler.blogspot.com

Do you have any rituals you follow when finishing a piece of work?

Most writers never feel their work is truly finished. There’s always one more word change or another thought that comes to mind after it’s been sent in. James N. Frey, author of How to Write a Damn Good Novel, wrote “You will know when your novel is finished. You will feel like throwing up whenever you look at it.” When I get to that point, I set the manuscript aside for two to four weeks, let my mind rest, go do something else, then come back to it with (I hope) fresh eyes. I will read the entire piece out loud to myself. Sometimes I’ll record it and listen back to it to flush out anything else that needs tweaking. Then I take to the post office, gaze at the envelope like it’s my kid going off to kindergarten, maybe even give it a light kiss (the clerks think I’m nuts), and send it off to my editor with a silent prayer to the gods she will like it.

What are you currently working on?

I’m currently re-editing Into the Path of Gods, the first book in the series. Since it came out more than ten years ago, my writing style has matured and my editor asked me to update the book. The whole series will be re-released in electronic form next year and possibly trade paperback as well. I’m also in the beginning stages of researching my next project, which will be a novel-length work of several interconnected stories, each set in a different time period.

Do you have any advice for writers or readers?

To writers: I would say, if your characters are telling you to go in a different direction, listen to them. They are probably right. Marcus has often dragged me around kicking and screaming where I’d never planned to go. When I gave in and followed him, the pieces of the story finally made sense. I had been trying to force him into situations he never would have gotten himself into. Sometimes I think he’s smarter than I am. In fact, I’m sure of it.

What do you feel is your biggest strength?

I’m not afraid to throw out something that doesn’t work. When I drafted my second book, In the Shadow of Dragons, I dumped the last third at least six times before I felt it was right. I also threw out eight chapters in the beginning of the third book, The Anvil Stone, and started over. The first chapter was good, but I hated the plot line after that. So I restructured it (listening to Marcus again) and found the direction that ultimately paid off. I believe there are many aspiring authors who refuse to revise. It’s an essential part of writing, just like research, and can be as enjoyable and satisfying as the initial writing itself. It’s where the craft of writing becomes art.

What do you feel sets this book apart from others in the same genre?

A Land Beyond Ravens creates a completely different voice for fifth century Britain. The Arthurian portion is on the fringes of the main story, which is a combination of historical fiction and spy thriller. I never wanted to do another retelling of the legend because that’s been done over and over.

What is the most important lesson you have learned from life so far?

Stubbornness can be a good thing. It can be bad too, depending on the scenario, but if you want to achieve a goal in this tough world, persistence is key.

Is there anything you regret doing/not doing?

In some ways I wish I’d had the guts to pursue a career in archaeology. I love the exploration of the physical remains of history and trying to puzzle together what it all means. It would have also given me the opportunity to travel and possibly live in other countries. I have an art degree, which I don’t regret at all, and probably have enough work in history and literature to have earned degrees in both of those as well. I can’t say I truly regret anything in my life—I love this journey of writing historical fiction and hope to continue on it as long as I my mind has sense.

What is your favorite past-time?

Hiking the beautiful Rocky Mountains that surround the place I live in northwest Colorado. If only I had more time for it!

Is there anything else you would like to share with us?

Just that I’ve been blessed with a good life and along with it the gift of writing. I’ve learned to run with it, not squander it. It was meant to be.

And please know I appreciate the opportunity to chat with you today.

Kathleen

About the Author


Novelist Kathleen Cunningham Guler is the author of the multi-award winning Macsen’s Treasure Series. Drawing on a long background in literature and history as well as her Welsh and Scottish heritage, she has published numerous articles, essays, reviews, short stories and poetry. The author is a member of the Historical Novel Society, the International Arthurian Society and participates in various writing organizations.

You can visit her website at KathleenGuler.com

A Land Beyond Ravens

About the Book


No one in 5th century Britain knows more secrets than master spy Marcus ap Iorwerth, and that makes him a dangerous man. It also makes him a hunted one. For nearly three decades he has manipulated stubborn, irascible kings and warlords in a quest to not only unite them against foreign invasion but to stop them from destroying each other as well. And along with his beloved wife Claerwen, he has followed a greater, even more perilous pursuit—to forge a clear path for the fulfillment of Merlin the Enchanter’s famed prophecy that one day a great king will take command, the king known as Arthur of the Britons.

Now, with Arthur at last on the brink of adulthood and already showing great promise as a leader, Marcus discovers that the emerging Christian church is gaining enough power to dangerously shift control of Britain. At the same time Claerwen, gifted with second sight, is plagued with strange dreams that connect inexplicable doom to both Arthur and a long lost grail sacred to Britain’s high kings.

As foreboding mounts, Marcus struggles to prevent the church from crushing Arthur’s chances of becoming an effective king. But how he goes about it sets up the very doom that Claerwen sees. Will she be able to stop him? Or will her visions send Marcus to his own doom as well?